Graduate Courses in Biological Sciences

The following courses are offered to graduate students at the School of Biological Sciences. Most courses are offered either annually or biannually. See Schedule of Classes for current schedules of classes. For the list below, after the title of the course is the number of class hours per week, the number of lab hours per week, and the number of credit hours earned for the completed course.

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APPH 6202. Clinical Gait Analysis. 3 Credit Hours.

Analysis of normal and pathological human locomotion. Study of theory and instrumentation for measurement of temporal and spatial kinematics and kinetics, electromyography, and plantar pressure.

APPH 6203. Biomechanics and Kinesiology in Prosthetics and Orthotics. 2 Credit Hours.

Mechanics of human movement applied to the study of artifical limbs and braces. Emphasis on neuromuscular control, Newtonian mechanics, kinematics and kinetics.

APPH 6209. Clinical Pathology. 2 Credit Hours.

Systems level overview of human pathology with emphasis on the effect of disease on human movement and neuromechanical function.

APPH 6211. Systems Physiology I: Cellular Mechanisms of Plasticity. 3 Credit Hours.

The course will focus on adaptations of skeletal, muscular, and neural systems at the cellular level.

APPH 6212. Systems Physiology II: Physiology of Neuromotor Tissues. 3 Credit Hours.

The course will focus on function and adaptations of skeletal, muscular, and neural systems. Interactions among the various systems and their plasticity will be emphasized.

APPH 6213. Systems Physiology III: Integrated Systems and Adaptation. 3 Credit Hours.

The course will focus on integrative mechanism impacting motor system performance. Interactions among the various systems and their plasticity will be emphasized.

APPH 6214. Laboratory Rotations in Prosthetics and Orthotics. 2 Credit Hours.

This course will provide the opportunity for students in individual laboratories to support their graduate training in prosthetics and orthotics.

APPH 6215. Studies in Responsible Conduct of Research in Prosthetics and Orthotics. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will cover areas related to research ethics, the responsible use of animial and human models and collaborative research issues in prosthetics and orthotics.

APPH 6216. Studies in Rehabilitation Research: Prosthetics and Orthotics. 1 Credit Hour.

This course will provide students in the PhD Training Program in Prosthetics and Orthotics to study issues in Rehabilitation Medicine.

APPH 6223. CAD/CAM in Prosthetics and Orthotics Laboratory. 1 Credit Hour.

Theoretical and practical analysis of the application of computer-aided design and manufacturing to prosthetics and orthotics. Includes methods of digitization and multiple manufacturing processes.

APPH 6225. Biostatistics. 3 Credit Hours.

Introductory statistical principles and methods of experimental design, sampling, power estimation, and hypothesis testing using ANOVA and regression.

APPH 6230. Exercise Metabolism. 3 Credit Hours.

The course will focus on the biochemical pathways that provide fuel for the human body during rest and various levels of physical activity.

APPH 6231. Biomechanical Aspects of Human Motor Control. 3 Credit Hours.

The course will examine selected motor control problems that the nervous system faces in the process of managing this mechanical complexity.

APPH 6232. Locomotion Neuromechanics. 3 Credit Hours.

This is a course that will introduce topics on the biomechanical and neural aspects of the control of limbed locomotion and movement.

APPH 6233. The Aging Movement Control System. 3 Credit Hours.

The aim of this course is to review research literature dealing with the effects of advances in age on the CNS and motor performance.

APPH 6234. Physical Activity as a Human Behavior. 3 Credit Hours.

Focus is on understanding physical activity as a behavior using health behavior change models. An interdisciplinary perspective integrating research from the fields of epidemiology, physiology, and psychology.

APPH 6235. Mechanics and Pathomechanics of Movement Control. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is designed to understand the potential effects of selected disorders of the neuromuscular system on movement control.

APPH 6236. Neuromuscular Physiology. 3 Credit Hours.

This course discusses the application of current experimental techniques in human studies in vivo.

APPH 6237. Methods of Human Neuroimaging. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of the course is to introduce various methods of functional neuroimaging in humans.

APPH 6238. Ion Channel Structure, Function and Regulation. 3 Credit Hours.

This course will examine the structure, function and regulation of ion channels from both excitable and non-excitable cells.

APPH 6239. Movement Disorders. 3 Credit Hours.

This course serves as an introduction to the clinical and research aspects of movement disorders.

APPH 6400. Human Neuroanatomy. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is to learn the anatomical makeup of the human nervous system. In this course we will closely examine details of central and peripheral neuroanatomy with links to function. As well, comparisons with non-human vertebrate neuroanatomy will be made.

APPH 6500. Classics in Neuroscience. 1 Credit Hour.

The purpose of this seminar is to learn and explore the history of neuroscience from a perspective of reading classic papers that have evolved.

APPH 6600. Muscle Structure and Plasticity. 3 Credit Hours.

Covers the biological processes underlying skeletal muscle structure and function, as well as rigorous mathematical models of those processes.

APPH 6651. Human Anatomy. 4 Credit Hours.

The study of human system anatomy involving cadaver dissection, lectures and practical exams. The human muscular, nervous, skeletal and cardiorespiratory systems will be emphasized.

APPH 6710. Ethics of Biotechnology and Bioengineering Research. 3 Credit Hours.

This course examines the ethics of biotechnological research, including issues in the realm of research ethics, bioethics, and healthcare robotics.

APPH 6746. Rehabilitation Engineering. 3 Credit Hours.

Students will participate in rehabilitation engineering as practiced in the assistive technology industry. Credit not allowed for both APPH 6746 and ME 6746.

APPH 6895. Lower Limb Orthotics I. 3 Credit Hours.

This course is the first part of a two course series and sets the essential elements of theory, technical design and patient management.

APPH 6896. Lower Limb Orthotics II. 4 Credit Hours.

This course is the second in a two part course series and applies more advanced elements of theory, technical design and patient management.

APPH 6971. Introduction to P&O Processes and Clinical Methods. 1 Credit Hour.

This course introduces basic processes for fabrication of prostheses and orthoses. Clinical methods associated with the provision of prostheses and orthoses will also be introduced.

APPH 6975. Introduction to Prosthetics. 2 Credit Hours.

This course introduces the history and development of external limb prostheses including their design, alignment, socket interfaces, suspension mechanisms, and components.

APPH 6981. Upper Limb Prosthetics. 4 Credit Hours.

Clinical training for the practice of prosthetics emphasizing adult and pediatric upper limb prostheses.

APPH 6982. Spinal Orthotics. 4 Credit Hours.

Clinical training for the practice of orthotics emphasizing adult and pediatric spinal orthoses.

APPH 6983. Upper Limb Orthotics. 3 Credit Hours.

Clinical training for the practice of orthotics emphasizing adult and pediatric upper limb orthoses.

APPH 6984. Transtibial Prosthetics. 4 Credit Hours.

Clinical training for the practice of prosthetics emphasizing adult and pediatric transtibial (below knee) prostheses.

APPH 6985. Transfemoral Prosthetics. 4 Credit Hours.

Clinical training for the practice of prosthetics emphasizing adult and pediatric transfemoral (above knee) prostheses.

APPH 6997. Assistive Technology. 1 Credit Hour.

Theories and devices associated with assistive technology and mobility aids, emphasizing topics important to clinical practice in prosthetics and orthotics.

APPH 6999. Clinical Practicum in Prosthetics and Orthotics. 1-21 Credit Hours.

Clinical observation of the practice of prosthetics and orthotics and related medical disciplines.

APPH 8000. Seminar. 3 Credit Hours.

The purpose of this course is for students to learn the research process from the early stage of identifying a question through publication of work.

APPH 8009. Research Seminar I. 1 Credit Hour.

A forum for graduate students in prosthetics and orthotics to present topics related to their research interests.

APPH 8010. Seminar in Prosthetics and Orthotics. 1 Credit Hour.

A forum for graduate students in prosthetics and orthotics to present and discuss topics related to their research interests.

APPH 8012. Research Seminar III. 3 Credit Hours.

A forum for graduate students in prosthetics and orthotics to present topics related to their research interests.

APPH 8801. Special Topics. 1 Credit Hour.

Topics of special interest not covered in the regular course offerings.

APPH 8802. Special Topics. 2 Credit Hours.

Topics of special interest not covered in the regular course offerings.

APPH 8803. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics of special interest not covered in the regular course offerings.

APPH 8804. Special Topics. 4 Credit Hours.

Topics of special interest not covered in the regular course offerings.

APPH 8813. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics of current interest not covered in other courses.

APPH 8823. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics of current interest not covered in other courses.

APPH 8833. Special Topics. 3 Credit Hours.

Topics of current interest not covered in other courses.

APPH 8901. Special Problems. 1-21 Credit Hours.

Individual studies and/or experimental investigations of problems of current interest.

APPH 8902. Special Problems. 1-21 Credit Hours.

Individual studies and/or experimental investigations of problems of current interest.

APPH 8903. Special Problems. 1-21 Credit Hours.

Individual studies and/or experimental investigations of problems of current interest.

APPH 8904. Special Topics. 1-21 Credit Hours.

Individual studies and/or experimental investigations of problems of current interest.

APPH 8997. Teaching Assistantship. 1-21 Credit Hours.

This course if for students holding a graduate teaching assistantship.

APPH 8998. Research Assistantship. 1-9 Credit Hours.

For graduate students holding research assistantships.

APPH 9000. Doctoral Thesis. 1-21 Credit Hours.

 

BIOL 6150: Genomics and Applied Bioinformatics, 3-0-3: Retrieval and analysis of biological sequence, gene expression, and proteomics data from public databases and other sources; applying standard bioinformatics tools to investigate biological questions. 

BIOL 6221: Biological Oceanography, 3-0-3: An introduction to the major biological processes in the ocean, including primary production, elemental cycling, food webs, and fisheries.

BIOL 6410: Microbial Ecology, 3-0-3: Advanced studies of microbial ecosystems, the specific roles of bacteria in maintaining ecological balance, and the evolution of the ecosystem in response to changing environments.

BIOL 6417: Marine Ecology, 3-0-3: An overview of the ecological and evolutionary patterns, processes, and mechanisms affecting the organization, structure, and function of a broad variety of marine communities.

BIOL 6418: Microbial Physiology, 3-0-3: Study of the physiology of growth and metabolic activities of microorganisms.

BIOL 6422: Theoretical Ecology, 3-0-3: Theoretical foundations of ecology, from the population to the community and ecosystem levels.

BIOL 6428: Population Dynamics, 3-0-3: Students will examine the ecological factors that affect dynamics, regulation, and evolution of natural populations, emphasizing the connections with mathematical models, genetics, and ecology.

BIOL 6478: Methods in Molecular Biophysics, 3 Credit Hours: An introduction to biophysical methods that are employed to study biological macromolecules and their interaction to gain understanding of how they function. 

BIOL 6480: Evolutionary Developmental Biology-How to Build an Organism, 2 Credit Hours: This course teaches students how the process of development from embryo to adult impacts evolutionary diversity and human health. 

BIOL 6570: Immunology, 4-0-4: A survey of modern immunology and its applications, with emphasis on immunological methods used in molecular and cell biological research.

BIOL 6600: Evolution, 3-0-3: An introduction to evolutionary patterns and processes, including the history of life, phylogenetics, population genetics, quantitative genetics, molecular evolution, and other important topics in evolutionary biology.

BIOL 6607: Molecular Microbiology, 3-0-3: Molecular genetics of bacteria with an emphasis on experimental approaches, regulatory mechanisms in disease-causing and environmental bacteria, and biotechnology applications derived from microbes.

BIOL 6608: Advanced Microbial Genetics, 3 Credit Hours: Molecular mechanisms of bacterial and plasmid genetic processes. Topics covered include genome organization, DNA replication, transcription, and translation.

BIOL 6611: Advanced Microbial Physiology, 3-0-3: Advanced studies of selected aspects of the physiology of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms.

BIOL 6620: Aquatic Chemical Ecology, 3-0-3: The course focuses on understanding the chemical mechanisms of aquatic signaling and the cascading effects on population regulation, community organization, and ecosystem function.

BIOL 6623: Experiments in Aquatic Chemical Signaling, 6 Credit Hours: A full-time commitment to student-originated, but faculty-guided, interdisciplinary research in aquatic chemical signaling using field, lab, and flume facilities at Skidaway Institution of Oceanography on the coast.

BIOL 6626: Physiological Ecology, 3-0-3: Study of the basic physiological processes and systems in vertebrates and invertebrates. Comparative study on how these systems are adapted for specific environments and functions.

BIOL 6628: Aquatic Toxicology, 3 Credit Hours: Study of the biological effects of toxicants on aquatic organisms-mechanisms of toxicity, biotransformation, toxicity tests, ecological risk assessment.

BIOL 6630: Advanced Microbial Ecology, 3 Credit Hours: Advanced studies of selected aspects of the ecology of prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms.

BIOL 6720: Env Microbial Genomics, 3-0-3: To introduce advanced concepts and principles of contemporary environmental microbiological research and assosciated bioinformatics techniques through representative examples from recent literature. 

BIOL 6756: Signaling Molecules, 3-0-3: The diversity of chemical signals between organisms and their structural specificities will be presented along with chemical and biological methods for isolating signaling molecules.

BIOL 6765: Geomicrobiology, 3-0-3: Interactions between microorganisms and the geosphere, microbial energetics and genetics; geochemical controls on microbial diversity and activity.

BIOL 6XXX. Biology Elective. 1-21 Credit Hours.

BIOL 7000. Master's Thesis. 1-21 Credit Hours.

BIOL 7001: Foundations in Molecular and Cell Biology, 4 Credit Hours: The goal of this course is to provide new students with fundamental knowledge in the general areas of prokaryotic and eukaryotic molecular biology, biochemistry, structural biology, and bioinformatics.

BIOL 7010: Advanced Cell Biology, 3-0-3: Current topics in eukaryotic cell biology including membrane functions, intracellular sorting and compartmentalization, cell signaling, cell cycle, cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, motility, and current experimental approaches.

BIOL 7015: Cancer Biology & Technology, 3-0-3: This course covers the major concepts of cancer biology as well as to state-of-the-art technologies that are being applied to cancer research, detection and treatment.

BIOL 7023: Bioinformatics, 2-3-3: Introduction to mathematical, statistical, and computer methods of nucleic acid and protein sequence analysis and interpretation. Algorithms for gene finding, protein structure and function prediction, constructing phylogenetic trees.

BIOL 7101: Graduate Sensory Ecology, 4 Credit Hours: A quantitative analysis of how organisms of all kinds obtain information about their environment, and how they use it to guide locomotions.

BIOL 7110: Macromolecular Modeling, 4-0-4: Principles and practices in the use of molecular mechanics methods (minimization: molecular dynamics) to study structure-function relationships in biological macromolecules.

BIOL 7111: Molecular Evolution, 3-0-3: Evolutionary processes at the molecular level, organizations of genomes and genetic systems. Students will read and present up-to-date research articles in various topics in molecular evolution.

BIOL 7200: Programming for Bioinformatics, 3 Credit Hours: This active-learning, project-based course provides a rigorous introduction to scientific computing for bioinformatics, including Linux utilities, shell scripting and bioinformatics programming.

BIOL 7210: Computational Genomics, 3 Credit Hours: In this active learning class, students will learn to convert sequence information into knowledge through the use of computational genomics tools, applications and databases.

BIOl 7668: Eukaryotic Molecular Genetics, 3-0-3: Topics in molecular genetics of eukaryotic organisms, including: gene structure and expression, protein processing and folding, genome stability, and molecular evolution.

BIOL 7913: Advances in Microbiology, 2 Credit Hours: Topics of current interest in microbial physiology, applied microbiology, microbial ecology, and medical microbiology.

BIOL 7914: Advances in Bacteriology, 2 Credit Hours: Topics of current interest in the physiology and ecology of bacteria and applications to practical problems.

BIOL 7923: Advances in Ecology, 2-0-2: Topics of current interest in the general areas of population growth and limitation, and the structure and stability of ecosystems.

BIOL 7924: Advances in Environmental Biology, 2 Credit Hours: Topics of current interest in environmental biology.

BIOL 7963: Advances in Molecular Biology, 2-0-2: Topics of current interest in molecular biology.

BIOL 7964: Advances in Genetics, 2-0-2: Topics of current interest in genetics.

BIOL 8000: Integrative Biology Seminar, 2 Credit Hours:A reading and discussion course structured around the School of Biology weekly seminar.

BIOL 8001: Seminar, 2 Credit Hours: Presentation of research seminar.

BIOL 8002: Seminar, 1-0-1: Weekly seminars on current research presented by various scientists in the field of biology.

BIOL 8003: Seminar, 1-0-1: Weekly seminars on current research presented by various scientists in the field of biology.

BIOL 8005: Signals in the Sea Seminar, 2-0-2: Students and invited authorities in the field will present seminars and lead discussions focused on currently emerging topics in aquatic chemical ecology and signaling.

BIOL 8006: Integrative Approaches to Biological Systems, 2 Credit Hours: This course will investigate, using samples from the literature and faculty research, the general principles of biological systems, from gene expression circuits to ecological communities.

BIOL 8106: Tools of Science Seminar, 2-0-2: The course aims to expose graduate students to some of the tools they will need as scientists and to discuss concerns and issues that affect all successful scientists. Additionally, through discussions the in-person NSF/NIH requirements for Responsible Conduct for Research (RCR) training will be fulfilled. 

BIOL 8804: Foundations of Quantitative Biosciences

BIOL/EAS 8813: Special Topics: Biodiversity Dynamics, 3-0-3: A project-based course, will explore where plants and animals live on the landscape, and how and why they move or evolve in response to environmental changes and human impacts.

BIOL 8744:  Microbial Symbiosis & Microbiomes, 3-0-3.  This course explores core topics in the field, including the chemical basis of microbe-host interactions, the role of microbial symbiosis in genome evolution and ecology, and the effects of microbiomes on human health.  

CETL 8000: Biology Graduate Teaching Assistantship Preparation, 1-0-1

 

The following are new courses recently developed by Georgia Tech Biology which are also available for course credit:

BIOL 8802: Special Topics: Evolutionary Development Biology, 2-0-2

BIOL 8802: Special Topics: Programming for Bioinformatics, 2-0-2

BIOL 8802: Special Topics: Quantitative Genetics, 2-0-2

BIOL 8802: Special Topics: Experimental Genomics, 2-0-2

BIOL 8802: Special Topics: Graduate Seminar in Ecology & Evolution, 2-0-2

BIOL 8802: Special Topics: Entrepreneurship in the Life Sciences, 2-0-2

BIOL 8803: Special Topics: Mathematical Biology, 3-0-3

BIOL 8803: Special Topics: Introduction to Bioinformatics & Genomics, 3-0-3

BIOL 8803: Special Topics: Computational Genomics, 3-0-3

BIOL 8803: Special Topics: Population Biology, 3-0-3

BIOL 8803: Special Topics: Protein Biology, 3-0-3

BIOL 8803: Special Topics: Computational Systems Biology, 3-0-3

BIOL 8803: Special Topics: Membrane Biology, 3-0-3

BIOL 8803: Special Topics: Evolutionary & Synthetic Biology, 3-0-3

BIOL 8803: Special Topics: Drug Discovery, 3-0-3

BIOL 8803: Special Topics: Developmental Biology, 3-0-3

BIOL 8803: Special Topics: Medical Microbiology, 3-0-3

BIOL 8803: Special Topics: Frontiers in Molecular and Cell Biology, 3-0-3

BIOL 8803: Special Topics: Community Ecology, 3-0-3

BIOL 8803: Special Topics: Human Evolutionary Genomics, 3-0-3

BIOL 8803: Special Topics: Proteomics - Technologies and Applications (3-0-3)

BIOL 8803: Special Topics: Chromosome Biology and Human diseases

BIOL 8803: Special Topics: RNA Biology and Biotechnology, 3-0-3: The purpose of this course is to introduce students (graduate and upper level undergraduate) to the fundamental concepts of RNA biology and to state-of-the-art biotechnologies that use RNA for medical and industrial applications.

BIOL 8803: Special Topics: Epigenetics, 3-0-3: This seminar and lecture course intends to introduce basic concepts and mechanisms of epigenetics and to discuss the central and emerging roles of epigenetic regulation in stem cell biology, mammalian development and human disease.

BIOL 8803: Special Topics: Origin of Complex Life, from Cells to Societies 3-0-3: In this class you will learn the both how major transitions can occur in evolution and what we know about how complex life has evolved on Earth.

In addition to the graduate courses above, graduate students may enroll in a limited number of undergraduate courses and courses from other Schools towards their graduate degree (see Graduate Handbook for more information on allowable limits). Please see the Georgia Tech catalog for information on undergraduate courses.